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Camp Shelby Sewer Rehabilitation

At the largest state-owned and operated field training center in the United States, it is critical for the installation to have a working and vastly connected sewer system.

 

By Sarah Smith McEwen   


 

 

During Pump Station Construction at Camp Shelby. IMAGES COURTESY WAGGONER ENGINEERING


 

 

In 2013 Waggoner Engineering completed several projects for the Mississippi Military Department, including design and construction administration of a parachute drying tower, which was approximately 70-ft in total height and with overall dimensions of approximately 22-ft². The purpose of the project was for drying personnel and cargo parachutes at the North West Street Readiness Center. The firm also provided design services for foundation drainage system repair at the Forest Readiness Center. The Forest Readiness Center was experiencing foundation movement, and Waggoner was tasked with the re-design of the foundation drainage to improve the stability of the foundation. The project included concrete pavement design, foundation drainage design, and civil/site work.

All of these projects developed relationships with the Mississippi Military Department. When we were commissioned for one of its military biggest projects yet, we knew the level of expectation and the need to deliver. This went beyond design into a desire to give back and best serve those who have served our country.

 

SITE HISTORY

The project, a sewer rehabilitation for Camp Shelby, in particular has fueled our relationship with the Mississippi Military Department. This project involves replacing the aging sanitary sewer collection system within the Cantonment Area at Camp Shelby.  Portions of this system date back to World War I, and due to  deterioration and damage, infiltration and inflow into the system is so great during wet weather and times of heavy rain that it overwhelms the collection system and the plant, requiring occasional by-passing. 

Camp Shelby is the largest state-owned and operated field training center in the United States. The sewer rehabilitation is important, because at any given year the facility could host as many as 100,000 personnel. Encompassing more than 134,000-acres, it is critical for the installation to have a working and vastly connected sewer system. Previous efforts to mitigate infiltration and inflow through slip lining pipe and coating manholes were largely unsuccessful because of high water tables not allowing a proper bond to the aged brick manholes and pipe connections at manholes.

 10-ft Contours Developed from LiDAR with Site Plan Overlay

DESIGN GOALS

The project anticipates replacing approximately 35 miles of the wastewater collection system with modern, low-infiltration pipe and manholes.  It may be possible to reduce the number of pumping stations by more than half, thereby greatly reducing maintenance and energy costs.  The primary objective is to bring the infiltration and inflow in line with permit requirements before the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Environmental Quality begin to levee additional fines and to provide modern collection and transport of Camp Shelby wastewater for the existing and projected populations and flows of the Training Site Cantonment Area.

The design includes all new pipe and manholes, installed by a combination of trenching, pipe bursting along existing routes, and directional drilling under roadways, environmentally sensitive areas, and other areas not suited for trenching or pipe bursting.  Gravity flow is used to the maximum extent practical.  However, due to the terrain and the location of the treatment facility, some six or seven pumping stations will be required. 

Design of the system was completed by July 2013, and construction is expected to take place over several years as funding becomes available. This project included a very condensed survey and design schedule which is extremely difficult for a project of this magnitude. 

 

BY THE NUMBERS

In order to eliminate major sources of infiltration and inflow from WWI and WWII vintage sewer lines, an estimated 200,000-ft of new sewer line, 750 new concrete manholes with mechanical pipe connections and epoxy linings, and seven new pumping stations will be added.

The project will include both force main and gravity sewer lines to be extended or refurbished. A new lagoon headworks inlet and screening structure will be constructed as well. Final construction cost is estimated to be between $20 million and $25 million—to be constructed in multiple phases as funding is available.

  

NEW TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS

In the conceptual phase, as part of the project kick off, a meeting was held that outlined how GIS could be utilized to assist in site design. Map data driven pages were developed to create properly scaled maps for use for depth of pipe calculations. This project included a lot of boots on the ground to field verify initial assumptions, but the initial layout and depth estimates were developed using LiDAR.  The Camp Shelby LiDAR was from the year 2007 3 meter. This was used to render 10-ft contour terrain that aided in the topography and preliminary alignment portion of design.

 

The project anticipates replacing approximately 35 miles of the wastewater collection system with modern, low-infiltration pipe and manholes.  It may be possible to reduce the number of pumping stations by more than half, thereby greatly reducing maintenance and energy costs.


  

As the project progressed, LiDAR was utilized more extensively to develop design paths and was calibrated as field survey became incorporated. The advantage of utilizing available mapping and GIS outputs allowed at a conceptual level the ability to anticipate line placement. Specifically, terrain data gathered through LiDAR indicated whether a proposed sewer line should be gravity line or force main. Camp Shelby had previously completed a GIS survey and captured most of their existing infrastructure and utilities.  This also helped to identify potential conflicts with existing utilities.

This project served as one of the first of its kind for using LiDAR as a supplement to field survey. It proved how valuable a tool it can be in conceptual site design. In the end, the differences in pipe depth estimates between 3 meter resolution LiDAR and actual were minimal.  As LiDAR improves, so will this accuracy.

 

A CONTINUED EFFORT

Waggoner has enjoyed a long and dedicated partnership with the local Mississippi Military Department. As far back as the early 1990’s, the company was providing support design service; this was the beginning of a long valued relationship. In 1994, Waggoner developed plans and provided construction services for the development of the helicopter training facility at Camp McCain. This camp played an integral role in training operations of the Air National Guard helicopter units. The plans for the training facility included an operations building, access roadway, concrete training pads, lighted helipad and fueling area, and water and sewer utilities.

Later, Waggoner was commissioned by the Mississippi Military Department to provide professional services in connection with the brick veneer failure at the Raymond Road Readiness Center in Jackson, Miss. The work included field investigation and damage assessment, preparation of opinions of probable cost, developing plans and specifications, and providing construction administration and construction review services.

Utilizing past relationships, design experience, and advanced mapping technology helped develop the blueprint by which Camp Shelby will be able to ultimately meet personnel and operational wastewater system demands.

    


 

Sarah Smith McEwen, EI, CFM is Water Resources Engineering Intern, Waggoner Engineering; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..