Enabling Mission Success

Naval Facilities Engineering Command is working to sharpen its focus—especially regarding cost, schedule and productivity—in order to continue to provide mission critical facilities and infrastructure support for the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps.

 

By Rear Adm. Kate Gregory, P.E., CEC, USN  

   


 Rear Adm. Kate Gregory, Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Chief of Civil engineers, speaks to more than 150 Seabees stationed at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, Calif., about the future of the Seabee rate and the important roles the sailors have in the Navy. U.S. NAVY PHOTO BY MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS JON DASBACH

Rear Adm. Kate Gregory, Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Chief of Civil engineers, speaks to more than 150 Seabees stationed at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, Calif., about the future of the Seabee rate and the important roles the sailors have in the Navy. U.S. NAVY PHOTO BY MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 2ND CLASS JON DASBACH 


 

Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) provides facilities engineering expertise for U.S. Navy and Marine Corps commanders, unified commanders, other Department of Defense components, and various federal agencies around the world.

As we celebrate our 173rd anniversary this August, our top priority remains providing exceptional support to our mili­tary leaders enabling their mission success. This happens through the hard work and dedication of our exemplary team of Civil Engineer Corps officers, Seabees and civilians along with our contractor partners who together build and maintain sustain­able facilities, deliver utilities and services, and provide Navy expeditionary combat force capabilities wherever and whenever they are needed around the globe.

 

SUPPORTING READINESS

Across NAVFAC we are sharpening our focus on our performance—especially regarding cost, schedule and productiv­ity. Many of the products and services we provide to the waterfront, at airfields, and in command and control complexes, directly impact Navy and Marine Corps operational readiness. We are analyzing the work we do through the warfighters’ “operational” lens to identify opportunities to improve their readiness while reducing costs.

We see significant opportunities to reduce infrastructure lifecycle cost through greater use and management of facility condition data and new technology. Two years ago, we deployed an aggressive system for collect­ing, managing and sharing component-level condition data. We are now using that information to better prioritize, plan and schedule projects and work. We are also improving our productivity by expand­ing use of the Geographic Information System to inventory our real estate and facility assets. We will build on our recently completed comprehensive utility invento­ries and condition assessments with nodal analysis of shipyard electrical systems to reduce outages, modernize resiliency, and improve shipyard readiness.

The results of these investigations will lead to prioritizing projects that are integrated into utilities maintenance and MILCON programs.

 

LEVERAGING FACILITY DATA

After much coordination with industry, we are implementing a Building Information Modeling (BIM) and Management Implementation Plan for design-build and architect/engineer design-bid-build projects in which the cost is more than $750,000 (new construction), or where the cost is greater than 50 percent of the replacement value (major renovations). By using detailed facil­ity data to identify and prioritize the projects needed most urgently, and by implementing BIM tools to aid design and execution, we expect to decrease the construction cost and minimize schedule increases for both NAVFAC and industry. BIM helps iden­tify and avoid conflicts between building systems. By formalizing 3D parametric modeling and facility data requirements, we will standardize our design and oversight processes globally.

We also are aggressively pursuing an Electronic Construction Management System to improve management of over $6.3 billion in construction and facilities support contracts. With a target deploy­ment in early FY2016, we anticipate increased efficiencies brought about by on-line collaboration of post-award design on design-build contracts, request-for-information and submittal collaboration and schedule control.

 

PROJECT PLANNING

Critical to improving our performance is our effort to “move execution to the left.” This means prioritizing, planning, design­ing and making repair and construction projects ready to advertise earlier in the budget cycle. By completing these steps earlier in the budget cycle, we see progress in our ability to do more comprehen­sive planning, site investigation and scope development. And it provides more time for our engineering and construction industry partners to develop proposals and execution strategies.

We are seeing some success in this effort this year, and expect to begin awarding more of our FY2015 work earlier in the summer. We also have begun FY2016 and FY2017 planning and design, with a goal of awarding 50 percent to 75 percent of the FY2016 planned program by late spring 2016. This will provide better buying power to the Navy and Marine Corps, and give more planning and development time to our industry partners.

Although we cannot predict with certainty the MILCON funding for future years, we do have some expectations regarding the nature of the programs. We expect to see the focus remain on platforms and new mission requirements, including runways, hangars, and support to the waterfront. Additionally, we anticipate investments in utilities as well as some quality of life and training programs for our sailors and Marines (especially barracks and opera­tional simulator facilities).

Construction Electrician 1st Class Fernando Marquez, assigned to the Public Works Department at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, provides oversight of a relay installation for the power generation units at the installation. U.S. NAVY PHOTO BY MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 1ST CLASS JULIA A. CASPERConstruction Electrician 1st Class Fernando Marquez, assigned to the Public Works Department at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, provides oversight of a relay installation for the power generation units at the installation. U.S. NAVY PHOTO BY MASS COMMUNICATION SPECIALIST 1ST CLASS JULIA A. CASPER 


 

FOCUS ON ENERGY

Energy remains a cornerstone of Navy readiness. It is an area of significant focus and investment, with the aims of reducing energy consumption, increasing the use of alternative fuels, and improving system security and resilience. To achieve these goals, we are expanding our use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) at multiple installations to solicit creative energy solutions from industry partners. We expect our ESPC program to enable industry to propose solutions that range from the more traditional facility-centric projects such as window and light replace­ment to methods for better energy manage­ment and expanded use of renewables at installations. Other energy initiatives that we will continue to pursue include expand­ing the use of alternative-fueled vehicles in our transportation fleet, supporting the Department of the Navy Renewable Energy Program Office’s work with third-party financed projects, and development of new technologies such as wave buoy and geothermal sources.

As always, we rely heavily on the capabili­ties and expertise of industry partners. We cannot succeed without them. For the third consecutive year, NAVFAC exceeded all Navy small business targets, setting records for Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business and Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business achievements. We awarded more than $3.6 billion in contracts (of our $8 billion total awards) to small busi­nesses, which requires tremendous team­work throughout the acquisition process between our small business professionals and representatives from the contracting and requirements arenas. This collaborative environment has enabled us to create and sustain a culture of responsiveness to small business opportunities and concerns. Our small business program is very important to NAVFAC and it will continue to be a major focus of effort command-wide.

  

“CAN DO” COMMITMENT

Finally, we are keenly focused on contin­ued recruitment, development, training and retention of our workforce. We will use innovative hiring initiatives (such as virtual job fairs, targeted recruit­ing, diversity event participation and expedited hiring procedures) to bring the right people at the right time to the right places in NAVFAC. We have work ahead in hiring and developing our number one asset: our people.

The men and women of NAVFAC continue to build on our 173-year history of providing and maintaining the shore infrastructure for the Navy and Marine Corps. I remain impressed by and grateful for the tremendous commitment, dedica­tion and passion that they display each and every day. It is because of their hard work and “Can Do” attitude that NAVFAC is able to provide mission critical support and enable supported commander success for the world’s finest Navy and Marine Corps.

   


 

Rear Adm. Kate Gregory, P.E., CEC, USN, is Commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command and Chief of Civil Engineers. She can be reached through NAVFAC Public Affairs at 202-685-9108.